Job and Culture Fit

 

Wouldn’t be great if you could see ahead of time how well a new hire fit the job, the team and the company culture? What if you could do the same thing for organizations you’re thinking about putting together or companies you’re thinking about buying?

Our Fit Assessment tools enable us to quickly and easily assess fit across several dimensions. We provide a visual, easy to use report that shows areas of fit as well as potential problem areas. We can also compare several candidates across domains, highlighting common themes, tradeoffs and areas to explore further.

 

Job/Culture Map & Match Tool

 

One of our tools, The Job/Culture Map & Match helps you:

  1. Articulate or make explicit key elements of an organization’s culture
  2. Articulate or make explicit key elements of a job
  3. Use these Job and Cultural elements along with Personal elements to assess fit

 

Culture Mapping

The Culture Map portion of the tool provides a means of articulating or making explicit key elements of an organization’s culture. It provides a map or architectural rendering of elements of culture that are otherwise difficult to make explicit.

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Users simply assess the culture along ten continuums, placing a mark on the continuum or moving the slider accordingly. Questions to help make the determination are included along with a place to note evidence or backup for why a designation was made. Once notations have been made for each of the continuums, there is a resulting map or visual rendering. This can then be used alongside a candidate’s personal map to see how well they fit.

 

Culture Matching

The person can be manually assessed along the continuums with notations of evidence the same way the culture was assessed or personality surveys may be used. We typically use a combination of LAB (Language and Behavior) Profile, Social Styles and 5-Factor (IPIP-NEO). Correlations can be made to other behavioral and values assessments.

Here’s an example of what a completed Map and Assessment might look like. The screen clip on the left shows the profile of the organization. The screen clip on the right shows the blue line profile of the organization along with two candidates. You can see that the Green candidate is a much better fit for the organization than the Orange one.

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Job Mapping

The Job Map portion of the tool provides a means of articulating or making explicit key elements of a particular job or work assignment. It works the same way as Culture Mapping.

Users simply build the map by assessing the job along eight continuums, placing a mark on the continuum or moving the slider accordingly. Questions to help make the determination are included along with a place to note evidence or backup for why an designation was made.

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Once notations have been made for each of the continuums, there is a resulting map or visual rendering. This can then be used alongside a candidate’s personal map to see how well they fit.

 

Job Matching

The person can be manually assessed along the continuums with notations of evidence the same way the job was assessed or personality surveys may be used. We typically use a combination of LAB (Language and Behavior) Profile, Social Styles and 5-Factor (IPIP-NEO). Correlations can also be made to other types of behavioral and values assessments. The results are displayed the same as those shown above for the Culture Match. Applicants are shown visually against the Job Profile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in finding out more about our tools and processes? Reach out today.

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The cost of a bad hire

The value proposition for job and culture fit is pretty simple. You need only look at the cost of a bad hire. The Department of Labor and SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management) studies put the costs of a bad hire at 2 1/2 to 5 times salary. For a $100,000 year employee, that’s $250,000 – $500,000. The Undercover Recruiter puts the costs even higher at roughly $840,000 for a $60,000 year mid-level manager (See info graphic below).

What makes up those costs? There are quantifiable costs on the front end for interviews, relocation, on-boarding, training and the like, and on the backend for outplacement, unemployment, COBRA and such. Then there’s the cost of mistakes, plus the more difficult to quantify elements such as lower morale and reduced performance in the group, customer dissatisfaction, lost revenue and the disruption caused when you finally decide to get rid of the bad hire.

Another cost we often don’t think about is manager’s time spent with bad hires. A Robert Half survey discussed in The Surprising Costs of a Bad Hire, showed managers spend 17% of their time managing poorly performing employees. That’s almost a full day each week for people that you probably shouldn’t have hired to begin with!